Jodie, born Joy Odiete is a young soulful singer who was one the favorite finalists in the premier edition of Idols, West Africa.

The singer and mother of a 12-month-old adorable boy with Lissencephaly and cerebral palsy, Jodie has been brave.

From a childbirth experience that almost took her life, to Doctors telling her he may die before he’s two years old, and people telling her to hide him and not take him, she has faced all the tough times with faith and courage.

In an emotional interview with Linda Ikeji TV, Singer Jodie shares the joys and challenges of raising her son, Chinua.

Read Excerpts:

On childbirth

I’m happy to be alive. When I was having my baby, I thought I was going to die at a point. Remembering the day I had my baby, it was chaotic and interesting. I was in this emergency CS and at a point when I was induced, I asked my husband if my son was okay because at that point, I was like, ‘God, if I’m going to die now, let me know if my baby is fine.’ I barely knew what was happening.

After then, I slipped into unconciousness and I felt like I was in an empty space. In that void, it was like me, myself and I. And I was like, at this point, it was either I was going forward or backward. It was like I was either going back to the life I know or leaving.

Then I started remembering the christian songs that I wrote and have not released. The summary of everything is that I’m happy I’m alive.

How the motherhood experience has shaped her

I’m learning about myself. I’m learning to love myself much more. I love my son and my boy is unique. I’m saying this not for sympathy but because some mothers find themselves in my shoes. The labour thing affected my son and he didn’t cry for nine hours on the first day.

Eventually, thank God he cried. He was admitted and doctors said different things about him. We finally got home and weeks later we started noticing depression in his head. We went to the hospital and did different kinds of scan and test.

Eventually, he was diagnosed with Lissencephaly and cerebral palsy. Lissencephaly is a rare brain disorder, cerebral palsy is the popular one and the doctor said, ‘there is no cure, manage it. We are so sorry.’

At a point, some doctors would say, ‘my dear, just leave this baby with your mother because you will run crazy.’ When I was told to leave my child for whoever, I wasn’t trying to be a super mom but at the same time, I didn’t know how to cope initially with all that news.

They’ll tell you, your child may not walk, he may not talk, he may die before he’s two years old. And they are telling you with more certainty than not and at the end of the day, they’ll say, there’s nothing prayer cannot do.

Then, you’ll hear people say, don’t take him out, don’t let people see him, don’t snap him pictures because he’s ‘special.’

I snap my child, his skull shape is not what people call perfect but it’s the most perfect I have ever seen. I take him out when I want to, when I can, his cry is a perfect one, the way he does is the perfect one. Im saying this because of mothers who have special kids, be proud of your child.

And sometimes, we don’t know why certain things happen. Be proud of your child, take your child out, spend money on the child if you have the money, if you don’t have the money, work and pray that God blesses you because its much more expensive taking care of a special child than an average child.

Being a mother to that special by has made me less afraid and willing to live.

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